interior painting,painters,home,commercial
Written by Colleen Kalil

Preparing to Paint

interior painting,painters,home,commercialFall is a great time to refresh your home’s interior. The weather is cooler and it’s an opportunity to get ready for the upcoming holiday season. The time it takes to prepare properly is well worth it when you see the results.

Furniture

If at all possible, remove the furniture from the room and cover the floor with a drop cloth. If you can’t take all the furniture out, push everything into the middle of the room and cover with plastic or another drop cloth.

Cleaning

Before you paint, clean your windows inside and out. It isn’t necessary for painting, but it will add to the freshness of the room. You can also check the frames and glass for any signs of wear or damage. When the windows are done, cover the glass with plastic using painter’s tape to protect them from drips and splatters.

Repair any cracks, chips, or other damage to your walls. If you have to use putty to fill holes, make sure you sand it smooth. If you don’t, you’ll see the outline under the paint. Dust the walls and ceiling if you plan to paint it. Wash the walls with warm water and a little mild cleaner. By removing the dust first, you avoid creating dirty streaks when you wash the walls. Vacuum any vents in the ceiling or in the floor.

Taping

The best order for painting is trim, ceiling, and walls. Tape around the trim and around the ceiling, then paint. Let the ceiling paint dry completely before taping the top of the walls. Some people hate taking the time to tape, but it saves time and creates a finished look.

Painting

If the current wall color is very dark and you’re applying a lighter color, prime the walls first. However, some brands of paint include primer or the texture makes primer unnecessary. Using a small brush, cut into the corners of the room, where the ceiling and wall meet, and around the trim. Do this for any place your roller won’t be able to reach. Paint the walls using a “W” pattern starting in one corner and covering a 3′ x 3′ area. This reduces visible seams where the paint overlaps.

Drying

Most latex paint dries to the touch in a few hours, but you shouldn’t let anything rest against the wall or wash it for at least 48 hours.

The professionals at University Painters take the time to prepare every surface in your home to achieve the best results. Call us today and schedule your fall refresh today.

house painter, Interior Painters ,Exterior Painters
Written by Colleen Kalil

Painting Concrete or Brick Surfaces

house painter, Interior Painters ,Exterior PaintersPainting is a great way to change the look of any surface, whether it’s inside or outside. Almost anything can be painted, including concrete and brick. With the proper equipment and knowledge, you can add to your home’s value and curb appeal.

Concrete Slabs (such as garage floors)

Before you paint a concrete floor, make sure no moisture comes through the slab. Tape around the floor where it meets the wall and wait for a few days. If there’s moisture on the tape, it’s best not to paint it.

If moisture isn’t a problem, sweep out any dirt and debris and wash the floor with a non-residue cleaner. Remove any old, flaking paint and grease spots. Next, etch the floor’s surface with a muriatic acid solution. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions and make sure you have good ventilation. Do not use it in a closed-in space.

Use a latex primer and paint specially made for concrete. Let the primer dry before applying the paint. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for both.

Brick

Before you paint brick, remember it’s a one-time decision. It is nearly impossible to remove paint from brick. Make sure it’s a step you want to take.

The best way to begin any painting project is with a clean surface. Use a wire brush to remove heavy dirt or debris and then wash with a solution of warm, soapy water. If you’re painting an entire house, you might be tempted to get out the power washer. That’s not a good idea; you’re likely to end up with gouges in the brick and you’ll damage the grout. Use a wire brush to spot clean and then use a regular hose to clean the area. You can get a foaming sprayer and then go over the surface again with plain water. Let the brick dry completely.

Use a quality latex primer as a first coat and let it dry completely. Next, apply latex paint for masonry using a long nap roller; use a brush to cover the grout. Don’t be in a hurry. Watch for dripping paint. Two coats are recommended for the best results.

University Painters can help you achieve the look you want for your home’s interior or exterior. Contact us today online at University Painters or call 800-390-4848.

interior painting, home painting
Written by Colleen Kalil

5 Colors You Should Never Paint Your Walls

Painting your home can be an overwhelming task and can feel like a chore at times. There are so many colors, combinations, and finishes to choose from. You sometimes wonder if you should go the easy route and paint it all white. You probably shouldn’t if you plan to resell your home down the road.

Painting your home may not be easy to do, but it’s one of the easiest ways to update the look of your residence. If you want to add a new coat of paint but will be listing your home soon, here are some shades you need to avoid.

Yellow

Never paint your kitchen yellow, no matter how warm the color makes you feel. Homes that had soft yellow or marigold kitchens sold for $820 less than other homes, according to Zillow. Yellow is a tricky and risky color to pull off when it comes to your home’s interior. While buttery yellow can look pleasing to the eyes, bright yellow can cause headaches and anxiety.

Dark Brown, Eggplant, or Any Dark Color

Dark brown is also not a hit with Zillow’s study. Bedrooms that had dark brown walls sold for $236 less than other homes. Colors like dark brown, eggplant, olive green, and green-brown make homes feel small, cramped, and dark. While buyers have the option to repaint their homes, they can’t see past these ugly shades.

Terracotta

Terracotta may look like another cheerful color, but even a muted terracotta can decrease the value of your home. Buyers aren’t crazy about bright orange walls since it’s one of the least-liked colors in the world. They also didn’t like seeing brick red and copper dining rooms and kitchens.

Gray-Blue or Slate Gray

While blue was one of the most-liked colors in 2017, buyers weren’t crazy about rooms with gray-blue walls. They didn’t take kindly to living rooms that featured muted silver, pastel gray, light blue, periwinkle, or slate gray walls. Gray may be a trendy color in fashion and interior design, but that doesn’t mean it’s likable. Paint your home’s dining room or living room gray or slate, and you could lose $1,112 when you sell it.

White, Off-White, or Eggshell

White bathrooms may seem simple and minimalist in design, but buyers disagree. A coat of this generic color could set your home’s selling price back by over $4,000, according to Zillow. Some people prefer off-white or eggshell because it makes a smaller room look brighter and bigger. Buyers, on the other, thinks it makes a room look “dead” and “flat,” especially if the room lacks in natural light.

Considering painting the interior of your home? Need to freshen up your space? Contact University Painters today for a free estimate and more information on our interior painting services.